Hanbok and Architecture: The Clash of Tradition and Modernity

Photo by Ke Chean Neoh. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

When we hear outdoor Hanbok photo shoot, I am sure many of us would think of shooting at Gyeongbok Palace, Changgyeonggung Palace, Bukchon Hanok Village or any other ancient remains or relics in Korea. But we wanted something different. So during the pre-shooting prep discussion with Azri and Neoh, we talked about having the photos taken at Dongdaemun Design Plaza, the neo-futuristic building stood elegantly and defiantly at Dongdaemun History & Culture Park Station. We thought the gray, spaceship-looking façade and the beautiful flowing lines of the building could create an avant-garde atmosphere to the photo.

So here are some of the photography works by the two talented photographers, Azri and Neoh. I love the harmonious clash of tradition and modernity in the pictures.

DDP and hanbok 2

Photo by Ke Chean Neoh. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

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collage DDP hanbok

Photo by Azri Idzuandi. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

hanbok ddp 7a

Photo by Azri Idzuandi. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

ddp and hanbok 1

Photo by Ke Chean Neoh. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

hanbok ddp 5

Photo by Azri Idzuandi. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

hanbok ddp6

Photo by Azri Idzuandi. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

hanbok DDP 4

Photo by Azri Idzuandi. Dongdaemun Design Plaza. All Rights Reserved.

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One candid photo showing what was behind the scene. On the left is Jamie the photogenic dongsaeng in a classic hanbok; in the middle is our lovely photographer Neoh, who totally nailed his modeling pose.

By the way, I am wearing a rental Hanbok sponsored by Oneday Hanbok, a friendly hanbok rental service provider based in Seoul. The simple, muted tones of my hanbok fit nicely with the background and created a sense of conformity. The sky blue upper-garment is called a Dang-ui 당의, a garment commonly wore over a short jacket (jeogori) by the queen consort, the king’s concubines, the sanggung (court matron), and the noblewoman. There are many different styles available at their new shop near the exit 8 of Chungmuro station 충무로역. Check my review on Oneday Hanbok here if you intend to rent a hanbok during your trip to Seoul!

**If you’re wearing a hanbok, you’re entitled a free admission to all the palace in Korea! (So far, I’ve entered palaces in Seoul and Jeonju for FREE for wearing a hanbok )

 

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